Monday Morning Auto News, Jan 22, 2018

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Audi continues to use dieselgate defeat devices. 127,000 cars affected

“Unbelievable!” exclaims Germany’s  BILD tabloid: More than two years after the dieselgate scandal became public, Volkswagen Group’s premium brand Audi still “produces and sells diesel cars with the illegal software.”  

According to the paper [German, paywall], Germany’s regulator KBA has found “illegal defeat devices” in V6 TDI diesel engines used in Audi A4, A5, A6, A7, A8, Q5, SQ 5, SQ 5 plus and Q 7.  127 000 vehicles are affected, the paper writes.

Even more unbelievable: The illegal engines were launched end of 2015, AFTER the scandal became public. [Continue Reading]

Friday Morning Auto News, Jan 19, 2018

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Thursday Morning Auto News, Jan 18, 2018

 

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Wednesday Morning Auto News, Jan 17, 2018

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Mitsubishi Electric’s AI camera promises price/performance breakthrough for autonomous cars

Hidetoshi Mishima (left) and his engineers (c) Bertel Schmitt

Today in Tokyo, Mitsubishi Electric announced a possible breakthrough on the rocky road to autonomous driving: An AI-powered camera that more than triples the detection range from 30 meters to more than 100.

Using Mitsubishi’s “Maisart” AI technology (it stands for “Mitsubishi Electric’s AI creates the State-of-the-ART in technology,” we were told with a straight face) the system could solve a conundrum that continues to plague the autonomous drive business: [Continue Reading]

Tuesday Morning Auto News, Jan 16, 2018

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BMW broke yet another sales record in a market that we are told is closed

BMW’s Kronschnabl presents yet another record year (c) Bertel Schmitt

Recently, Detroit’s previously strident rhetoric about the allegedly “closed market” Japan quieted down a bit. This after a series of articles with car importer after car importer showing that the “closed market” story is a blatant lie. Japan in fact has one of the world’s most open car markets, mostly due to American pressure. Zero percent tariff. 5,000 cars per year and model can be brought in with next to no paperwork. Try that in the U.S.A., where Detroit’s cash cow, the light utility vehicle, is protected by a 25 percent tariff, and a huge wall of other trade barriers.

Today, I could revisit the story, when Peter Kronschnabl, CEO of BMW Group Japan, presented his 2017 results, and yet another sales record.

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